Old Slave Mart Museum

oldslavemartENHANCEDThe Old Slave Mart Museum has operated sporadically since 1938.  It is often incorrectly called the Charleston Slave Market Museum, the Slave Mart Museum Charleston or the Old Slave Market Museum.

The Old Slave Mart Museum is the first African-American Museum.  It is often staffed by individuals who can trace their history to Charleston slaves.   Many people don’t realize that at one point during slavery as many as 35-40% of slave entered the United States through Charleston.   In addition to the staff, the building evokes an eerie feeling of days gone by.  There is a lot to learn.  There is an interview with a former slave that is fascinating.  Don’t expect the inside to look like it did when slaves were sold there.  Plan on spending at least an hour reading the very informative posters and soaking in the history.  Because of all the reading, the old slave mart museum is usually not entertaining for children. If you are looking for artifacts and items from the slave trade, you will be disappointed.  The Old Slave Mart Museum has some artifacts but not as many as some visitors have hoped for.




The Old Slave Mart Museum has operated sporadically since 1938.  It is often incorrectly called the Charleston Slave Market Museum, the Slave Mart Museum Charleston or the Old Slave Market Museum.

Thomas Ryan owned Ryan’s Mart which later became the Old Slave Mart.  It is located between Chalmers and Queen Streets.  The Old Salve Mart was built in 1859 and is considered the last surviving slave auction gallery in South Carolina. It was used briefly before the Civil War ended all slavery in the South.  It has been reported that all slaves were freed prior to the end of the war when Charleston was occupied by Union troops. In 1975, the Old Slave Mart was added to the National Register of Historic Places for its role in Charleston’s African-American history. Today, the building houses the Old Slave Mart Museum.  This museum is often called the Slave Market Museum.  The confusion around the “slave mart” and the “slave market,” have lead many to believe that the Charleston City Market is where slave were sold.

For additional great information about slavery in Charleston, South Carolina visit the Avery Research Center.

Click on image of the South Carolina Aquarium for coupons

South Carolina Aquarium